2016 Tomoka Left Over = Recovery

Never Give Up

Healing is not an overnight process. It is a daily cleansing of pain, it is a daily healing of your life.  

~Leon Brown

I was amazed that my petite body was handling Tomoka Marathon so well. I ran out of energy, but my discomfort was manageable – or maybe I was just numb that I didn’t even realized how much stress I was subjecting my body to.

Crossing the finish line was so unreal and powerful for me. I felt that with determination, hard work and support from family and friends, anything is possible as long as the flame to do what it takes is burning. I walked around and enjoyed some of the post-race festivities, grabbed a slice of pizza and some beet/orange juice from Natalie’s Orchid Island Juice company. It was delicious!

On our way to the car, my husband even mentioned how surprised he was to see me not limping as much like some runners were. “I’m amazed that I’m not feeling so bad but I know it’s coming; however, the chaffing is bothersome”, I replied back to him with some enthusiasm. He drove us to the hotel and when it was time to get up and move… Oh my goodness! Why did I gloat on feeling ‘almost pain free’?

From the parking lot to the hotel entrance, to the elevator, to the room and to the shower, each step was becoming slower and slower. Not only was my left shin getting sore by the minute with each step taken, but the damn chaffing inward my right tight burned like hell with the contact of the cool-warm water from the shower. Yet, I was still running really high on ‘runners high’ – and it was worth it!

Marathon training has taught me to be in the present more than anything else I’ve done. Of course every now and then, I glimpse on what’s ahead, but I refocus right where I am. Here’s what I’ve been doing for the past two weeks of recovery-mode.

  • Enjoy the moment: I got up at 3:15 a.m. on race day to get going with my pre-race routine and get everything ready for the 6:30 a.m. race. From this time forward, I did not stop (nap? what nap?) for one minute. We headed to the hotel to check-out, grabbed something to eat, drove 1 hour ½ to get home, stopped by Kurt’s dad to pick up our pooch, R2-D2, and then we got home around 3:45 p.m. We immediately started to unpack and organize stuff and I headed out to meet my running family for dinner at Coach Chris’ favorite restaurant – Don Julios. I didn’t get back home until close to 7:00 p.m., took a shower, and ate some more, called my mom and caught up on social media updates. By the time I went to bed, it was around 11:00 p.m. It’s amazing the energy you can find and create when you love what you do and have fun with it. I would do it again in a heartbeat!
  • Stretching/Foam Rolling: I cannot imagine not stretching or using the foam roller during recovery phase or training. The benefits are tremendous in promoting circulation, flushing out lactic acid and regaining flexibility and range of motion.

Therapies

  • Spinning Workout: Any cardiovascular activity is a great activity mainly the ones that have low impact on joints, muscles, tendons and bones. A 30-minute or 6 miles on the bike has worked out well for me and I’ve noticed steady healing and decrease on soreness.
  • Ice bath: I’m a big fan of ice baths because I feel so refreshed afterwards. Throughout summer long runs training, I made ice baths a priority, but I don’t overdo. There’s still a big debate on whether ice baths impact the benefits of a hard workout in a sense that it precludes the body from adapting to inflammation; therefore, getting stronger. It’s debated that it’s more beneficial in closing the gap between a hard workout recovery to the next hard workout or race. I use my own judgment on that and tune-in to my body. I just finished listening to Meb Keflezighi’s audiobook, Run to Overcome, and he makes ice baths part of his recovery so I’m not going to argue with that – and do what works for you! I make ice baths less intimidating by filling out the bath tub with cold water to my waist, dropping the 10 lbs bag of ice, wearing a hoodie, sipping some hot ginger tea and catching up on some reading. You will not even notice when the ice starts to melt and the water gets colder!
  • Diet: Fueling the body properly after a strenuous workout deserves attention just as the same as doing any physical recovery methods. I’m a vegetarian, but the only animal-derived foods I consume are eggs, honey and occasionally cheese. I try to keep it simple by avoiding acidic-producing food (animal protein (meat), grain, sugar, fish, processed food, refined carb) and consuming more alkaline-producing food (fruits and vegetables). Lately, I’ve been craving my homemade kale juice and beet juice. I also have supplemented my diet with more chia seeds. Drink water, water and more water!
Kale juice

I’m addicted to Kale juice!

  • Yoga/mediation: Years ago, I started to attend Kundalini Yoga, but got side-tracked with other things. After being more involved with running and reading Running With The Mind of Meditation – Lessons for Training the Body and Mind by Sakyong Mipham, it has given me a different perspective – a positive approach in being aligned with the body, mind and all things surround. Just as meditation presents different phases of learning and evolution, running is the same, and I’m grasping the interchangeable energy of physical activity and spiritual alignment.

Meditation

  • Warm Epson Salt baths and Massage Therapy: When massage therapy is not available, Epson salt bath is the answer. After a stretching and foam rolling session, I find Epson salt baths to be the most beneficial for me. Here’s a cool link on the benefits of Epson salt baths. Foam rolling is really good, but a massage therapist’s help in finding those tight knots where you had no idea it existed; it’s like winning the jackpot.
  • Chiropractor adjustments, graston, compression and hot therapy: I see my chiropractor as needed. I don’t like to overdo on adjustments, so I usually have one done before my longest run of training, four days before a major race and after a race. The combination of graston, compression boots and hot therapy is a remarkable tool to aid the healing process.
compression

Ahhh yes! These compression boots are awesome! 🙂

These recovery methods have been very helpful, but the recovery progress is not as fast I’d like to be. Meb’s recovery time after running the Olympics qualification trials this past February took three weeks. The effort I put into this past race was a high level for me so I guess I can chill out because three weeks is about the average time for recovery. I didn’t get to run until one week after Tomoka; my calves and shins were sore still – a slow 4-miler was all I could do for the day. I decided to rest more and focus on active recovery for the following week. A week later, I ran an easy 1.5-miler as a warm up and a 3.1-miler run with more effort. In terms of soreness I felt better, but the itchy on my tights (lactic acid) and sluggish feeling could not have been more evident.

Patience and patience. That’s what I need to keep in mind and be grateful for the small and big things. Thanks for reading, awesome people!

Gratitude

“Pain is nothing compared to what it feels like to quit.”

~ seen on marathon spectator sign

 

 

Advertisements

2016 Tomoka Marathon: Is this it?!

C running

“Go confidently in the direction of your dreams! Live the life you have imagined.” ~Henry David Thoreau

“Only those who risk going too far can possibly find out how far one can go.”

  ~ T.S. Eliot

It has been many months, many training runs and many mornings of anticipation for one morning of running. I was ready for Tomoka and nothing was going to stop me from finishing it – not even the weather.

The typical Florida weather did its thing as usual – toying with us on whether it was going to rain or not and on whether it was going to get hot like furnace or not. Considering its unpredictability, it could have been worse. At the start of the race at 6:30 a.m. and still dark, it was a stuffy 66°F and 94% humidity. I didn’t take chances in relying on water stops every other 1.5 mile so I carried my own fluids. I was stocked with nutrition – my favorite Sweet Potato & Sea Salt Cliff nutrition, Mango Huma gel and Chia peanut butter chocolate bar. I also had two electrolyte and two ibuprofen pills – just in case.

Huma

Huma gels are my favs – and it’s 100% vegan!

Clif

Yummy stuff!

The 1-miler mark came pretty quick, actually, and I was greeted by a faint, and yet, a powerful tone of voice saying: 25 more miles to go!” It was my husband. It was great seeing him, but not being reminded of the mileage ahead of me. I was getting hot already, and the fact that the sun was not out, wasn’t very optimistic. I stopped to remove my running top. It felt better and lighter, but I was still hot and my heart rate higher than I wanted. On the next water stop, I made sure to grab the half-filled-tiny-cup-of-water and poured it over my head.

The beauty of the Tomoka course filled with mature trees, beautiful architecture, and the fragrance of water from the marsh and the Halifax River helped distract my mind from the heat. I decided that the weather and my body would serve as a guide towards the best way to approach this journey. I did my best to cover as many miles as I could before the sunlight was full out. I was grateful that my body was somewhat okay with that strategy since calves and shin discomfort had been an issue.

By the 10-miler, I felt an unusual right knee discomfort, and by then, day light was out, but a little cloudy with possibility of rain. I acknowledged the discomfort while asking my knee to stay strong and let go of the pain. Again, the beauty of the course grabbed my attention to the nature surround me. The anticipation of meeting my husband at the 13-miler helped me to refocus and the information on the Pose Method of Running book kept me mindful of my running form. The pain went away and I felt like I could run strong.

At mile 10ish

At mile 10ish

At about the 11-miler, raindrops started to fall. It felt refreshing while I wished to stay that way instead of becoming a heavy rainfall. Having it finished my sweet potato/sea salt Cliff nutrition, I decided to take the two ibuprofen pills and one electrolyte pill at the 12-miler. I wanted to be pro-active and assure that it was a fun race.

I mistaken my husband thinking he was one of the race personnel camera guy taking my picture at the 13-miler water/Gatorade stop – all I noticed was the camera. I kept going and only slowed down when I heard him calling my name. It was encouraging to see him. He provided me with my during-activity drink and ice. It was so hot that I used the ice to put it inside my sports bra. Whether it was the sports drink placebo effect or not, I felt confident and reenergize. Knowing that I would see my husband again at the 16, 19 and 21-miler was also exciting. His support helped breakdown the long distance and solitude.

My husband's support and encouragement made a HUGE difference!

My husband’s support and encouragement made a HUGE difference!

Despite of having the luxury of such support (not everyone is as lucky as I am); the truth of the matter was that my pace was all over the place. The best pace came at the 17-miler as 10:19 min/mi, the medium pace at the 23-miler as 11:38 min/mi and the worst pace at the 26-miler a “yippee” 13:41 min/mi. Right off the start, I felt this race was going to be one that I had to do everything I could that was under my control not to go sour.

I wished for a sub-5 marathon, but the “wall” raised up around mile 23ish with the sight of the bridge on W. Granada Blvd. I kept pushing through. When I made the turn to climb the bridge, the will power to move my legs was non-existent. I only had the energy to walk through the highest point of the bridge. I picked up pace again at the top of the bridge only to take a quick walk at the end of the bridge. I decided to just go ahead and finish it, and somehow, I found the power to run towards the finish line.

Bridge view

Ugh!

I wanted nothing more than to finish and to put an end to my husband’s and my coach’s wait. When I saw the rug that covered the timer and crossed the finished line, a quick thought came to mind: “is this it?” It felt unreal. I saw my husband on the side line and in a split of a second, I saw Coach Chris holding my medal. She gracefully put it around my neck. I started crying immediately; gave her a “sweaty” hug (she didn’t mind), and soon after, my husband as he made his way through the volunteers giving out medals to other marathoners. I was hugging my husband in tears. Coach Chris’ husband, Steve, was there too. He had the thoughtful idea of suggesting that she award me with the medal. For that, I am very grateful. It was so unexpected and the days of training came all together in that moment.

Is this it? - that's the thought it came to mind as I saw the blue rug on the finish line.

Is this it? – that’s the thought it came to mind as I saw the blue rug on the finish line.

Six years ago I struggled to finish my first marathon at 6:46:48. This time, I finished with a little more grace, smiles and relatively pain free with a timing of 5:01:48. I only had a one-stop potty break at mile 15ish – and that was a real bathroom (no lines) inside the state park. Yippee!

Finish with K

Kurt was exhausted! 🙂

Group Pic

Coach Chris PR’ed!

It’s a big step forward for which I am grateful. This accomplishment would not be possible without the caring and support of my husband, my family, my running family and friends. The journey has only began. I am so happy!K&C Selfie
Tomoka Medal

“A marathoner is a marathoner regardless of time. Virtually everyone who tries the marathon has put in training over months, and it is that exercise and that commitment, physical and mental that gives meaning to the medal, not just the day’s effort, be it fast or slow. It’s all in conquering the challenge.”

~Mary R. Wittenberg